Edward Schumacher came from a large family that lived on a farm in the Cincinnati area. He grew up in the Lutheran Church, and benefitted from its teaching of the Catechism.

Ed was a hard worker, and even during the years of the Depression was able to make money because of his willingness to work. He enjoyed various jobs throughout his lifetime as a tool and diemaker, an insurance agent, and even as a representative to the Ohio House of Representatives. He was also on the Cincinnati Zoning Board, and the School Board that helped to form the Princeton School District.

Several things in his life helped to mold his character. He enjoyed reading and educated himself beyond his actual school experience. Ed often told the story of his rescue after being buried alive. He felt God had a special. purpose for his life. A Dale Carnegie Course brought Ed out of his shell, and he developed leadership skills. In his fifties, Ed trusted in Jesus Christ as his personal Saviour. His Bible knowledge then became very practical in his life

Life was not easy for Ed. He out-lived three wives as each one preceded him in death. He often said that his life had been greatly blessed by his wives, and left it up to the hearers to learn that he did not have three wives at one time. He also had a son, Skip, who was killed in an automobile accident. He never complained, and continued to serve God and his fellow man.

He loved his family. He and his wife Grace had two children — Jean and Skip. He and Ruth raised four children — Alan and Alison, and Dan and Judy Poe. Later in life Ed married Margie Smith.

Edward Schumacher was a great admirer of Dr. Carl Mclntire and his messages for God and country. Ed was greatly concerned with the state of the Church because of liberal theology, and with the socialist and communist ideologies being propagated in our country.

Ed and Ruth got help from Dr. Lynn Gray Gordon, head of the Home Mission Board for the Bible Presbyterian Church, and started the Grace Bible Presbyterian Church in Cincinnati, Ohio as the founding Elder. The church first met in the Holiday Inn listening to tapes by Dr. Mclntire, and special speakers arranged by Dr. Gordon.

Under Ed’s leadership, the Church called a Pastor, and rented a Church building and manse. The Church became self-sufficient after one year as a Home Mission Church.

Having teenage children, Ed was very helpful in youth activities — especially in inviting them over to his home. He sang in the Choir, and gave the church an organ in remembrance of his son, Skip

Ed always kept Missions as a high priority in the Church, and was pleased when Daryl and Judy Creamer and family went to Israel as the first missionaries from our Church. He delighted that his son Alan was in full time Christian ministry serving first as Minister of Music and Youth Director for fifteen years in Cincinnati, and then as Youth Director in Atlanta.

Ed was a great example to the Church by his life and his willingness to do whatever had to be done for the Church to succeed. He always attended every service and activity, and was an active Elder from 1965 to 1994. He faithfully represented the Church at Presbytery and Synod meetings.

Ed was a great example to the Church by his life and his willingness to do whatever had to be done for the Church to succeed. He always attended every service and activity, and was an active Elder from 1965 to 1994. He faithfully represented the Church at Presbytery and Synod meetings.

And I heard a voice from heaven saying unto me,
Write, Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth:
Yea, saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their labours, and their works do follow them.

(Revelation 14:13)

Adopted by the 64th General Synod of the Bible Presbyterian Church,
meeting in Cincinnati, OH August 3-8, 2000.

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